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IDProjectCategoryView StatusLast Update
0000107administrationpolicypublic2004-04-06 02:01
Reporteruser19 
PrioritylowSeverityminorReproducibilityalways
Status resolvedResolutionfixed 
PlatformOtherOSotherOS Version
Product Versionunspecified 
Target VersionFixed in Version 
Summary0000107: CentOS package modification policy
DescriptionIt has been suggested that as few packages as possible be modified from RH's
sources. RH has implied that only 2 packages need to be changed to respect their
trademarks.

Keeping changes to an absolute minimum will ensure maximum compatability with
RHEL. Even a minimal modification can change what an ISV may depend on for
compatability.

This is proposed for the main ISO's. Nothing would still prevent us from making
a CentOS-extras repository that could be designed to install over the base ISO
to make it a much more comfortable/functional OS.

At first, one might think that cAos2-GP could fill this goal, but based on the 5
year lifespan of CentOS3, one must assume that the delta will continue to grow
between the two projects until someday cAos2-GP might not be compatible with
CentOS-3 any longer.
TagsNo tags attached.

Activities

lance@uklinux.net

lance@uklinux.net

2003-12-12 23:45

reporter   ~0000415

Last edited: 1970-01-01 00:00

Agreed, but there are lots of little references to Redhat Linux and 'Red Hat
Inc' in different places that imho do need weeding out .

user19

2003-12-13 00:15

  ~0000416

Last edited: 1970-01-01 00:00

It might be good to make a 'branding' repository where all the branding like
this is done, it would also make it easier for others to brand themselves.

I see CentOS as a clone, which can be the base of many OS's, including cAos2-GP.
herrold

herrold

2003-12-13 01:01

reporter   ~0000417

Last edited: 1970-01-01 00:00

It was not just an implication as to the TradeMark -- they have staked out the
following:

"D. You must modify the files identified as REDHAT-LOGOS and ANACONDA-IMAGES so
as to remove all use of images containing the "Red Hat" trademark or Red Hat's
Shadow Man logo"

More fully:
http://www.redhat.com/about/corporate/trademark/guidelines/page5.html
Quoting for archive:
Red Hat Trademark Guidelines
The Relationship Between Red Hat's Trademarks And Our Red Hat® Linux® Software

Red Hat® Linux® is a collection of many different software programs, developed
both by Red Hat and other members of the open source community, which we gather
and build to create "Red Hat® Linux®." All software programs included in Red
Hat® Linux® are PGP or GPG signed, or otherwise authenticated, by Red Hat to
indicate that Red Hat built them. We make Red Hat® Linux® available via software
products on CD-ROM as well as free download on the Internet through our ftp site
and other authorized electronic download sites. We give each new release a
version number, which is usually expressed in the format "Red Hat® Linux® X.X."
As of April 2003, the most recent version number is Red Hat® Linux® 9.

As a licensee under the GPL and other applicable licenses, you have the right to
make changes to Red Hat® Linux® software and can market and distribute those
changes according to the terms of the license. Those changes may include making
modifications to certain portions of the software, adding new components that
were not included by Red Hat, or removing components that were included by Red
Hat. However, you may not call or brand your resulting product "Red Hat", or use
any Red Hat trademarks on your product or in any related advertising in any way.
Once you have made changes to the software, it is no longer the same as the
original, and as a result, it is inappropriate to name it or brand it as though
it is.

Red Hat does not restrict the rights granted to you under applicable copyright
licenses to copy, modify and redistribute the software contained in Red Hat®
Linux®. We encourage you to take full advantage of your rights under the
copyright licenses with respect to the software. However, it is important that
our customers and the public at large are easily able to determine which
products are Red Hat® Linux® and which products are versions of Linux-based
operating systems, including modifications of Red Hat ® Linux®, distributed by
parties unaffiliated with Red Hat.

-----------------------------------

and specifically for the asserted encumbered packages:
http://www.redhat.com/about/corporate/trademark/guidelines/page6.html

Red Hat Trademark Guidelines
Guidelines For Marketing Software Products Containing Unmodified Red Hat® Linux®
Software

As a licensee under the GPL and other applicable copyright licenses, you may
replicate the software contained in Red Hat® Linux® or Red Hat® Enterprise
Linux®, whether downloaded from an FTP site or other electronic download site or
copied from a CD originally produced by Red Hat, and may market the replicated
product in accordance with the terms of the copyright licenses. However, it
would be confusing to consumers if you identify such a replicated product as Red
Hat® Linux®.

If you do not qualify under and comply with the "Trademark Permissions" but want
to produce and market copies of Red Hat® Linux® or Red Hat® Enterprise Linux®
software, as it is developed and released by Red Hat without modification, you
may do so, provided you strictly follow these guidelines:

A. You must comply with all applicable copyright licenses for the software and
the guidelines in this document.

B. You may not name or brand your product "Red Hat Linux," "Red Hat Enterprise
Linux," or use the Red Hat trademarks in any way, either on your product or in
advertising. You must use a different trademark for your product that will not
cause confusion with the trademarks of Red Hat or another party, will not
indicate or imply that your product originates from or is sponsored or approved
by Red Hat, and which otherwise complies with applicable trademark laws. Please
also refer to the guidelines for use of the brand "Red Hat" and for plays on the
words "Red Hat."

C. You may not state that your product "contains Red Hat Linux X.X." or "Red Hat
Enterprise Linux X.X." This would amount to impermissible use of Red Hat's
trademarks. You may resell the boxed version of your software that you purchased
from Red Hat so long as you sell the original discs and documentation included
with the boxed version. However, if you have registered the product with Red Hat
for purposes of obtaining support services, you may not transfer your right in
those support services, and you must advise the purchaser that they are not
receiving support services.

D. You must modify the files identified as REDHAT-LOGOS and ANACONDA-IMAGES so
as to remove all use of images containing the "Red Hat" trademark or Red Hat's
Shadow Man logo. Note that mere deletion of these files may corrupt the software.

NOTE: The software contained on the Linux Application CDs that may be contained
in our boxed product include some proprietary products. If you wish to
distribute any of that proprietary application software, you must obtain a
license to do so from the owner of that proprietary application software. Please
do not copy any proprietary application software contained on the Linux
Application CD unless the license for that software permits you to do so or you
have obtained a separate license from the owner of the proprietary application
software.

---------------------------

http://www.redhat.com/about/corporate/trademark/guidelines/page8.html
Red Hat Trademark Guidelines
Publishing And Marketing Red Hat® Linux® or Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® Software
That Has Been Modified

As a licensee under the GPL and other applicable licenses, you may make
modifications to the software contained in Red Hat® Linux® or Red Hat®
Enterprise Linux® and may market the revised product in accordance with the
terms of the licenses. In order to do this, you must follow these guidelines:

A. You must comply with all applicable licenses for the software and the
guidelines in this document.

B. You may not name or brand your product "Red Hat," or use the Red Hat
trademarks in any way, either on your product or in related advertising. You
must use a different trademark for your product that will not cause confusion
with the trademarks of Red Hat, will not indicate or imply that your product
originates from or is sponsored or approved by Red Hat, and which otherwise
complies with applicable trademark laws. Please also refer to the guidelines for
use of the brand "Red Hat" and for plays on the words "Red Hat."

C. You may not state that your product "contains "Red Hat® Linux® X.X." or "Red
Hat® Enterprise Linux® X.X." This would amount to impermissible use of Red Hat's
trademarks. You may resell the boxed version of your software that you purchased
from Red Hat so long as you sell the original discs and documentation included
with the boxed version. However, if you have registered the product with Red Hat
for purposes of obtaining support services, you may not transfer your right in
those support services, and you must advise the purchaser that they are not
receiving support services.

D. You must modify the files identified as REDHAT-LOGOS and ANACONDA-IMAGES so
as to remove all use of images containing the "Red Hat" trademark or Red Hat's
Shadow Man logo. Note that mere deletion of these files may corrupt the software.

======================

So Lance's comment that a general 'weeding' is not needed seems correct. If one
reads the Changelogs on the formerly owning packages and the present packages
for Anaconda, and Anaconda-images, they seem to have already _had_ a 'weeding'
by Red Hat.



herrold

herrold

2003-12-13 01:05

reporter   ~0000418

Last edited: 1970-01-01 00:00

re-reading -- I seem to have misread Lance's comment. I guess I differ, and
think that those two packages represent the result of a conscious effort to weed
what it thought needed weeding by Red Hat personnel. include IAAL disclaimer.
lance@uklinux.net

lance@uklinux.net

2003-12-13 14:16

reporter   ~0000419

Last edited: 1970-01-01 00:00

How does 'you may not call your product RH... ' jibe with /etc/redhat-release
saying it is rh ... ??

WB have changed to /etc/wb=release and have already had problems with apps not
recognising the os - webmin.

My preference is to change as little as possible, but I feel that there are
references in help files, default web pages, and especially ananconda that do
need work.
herrold

herrold

2004-04-06 02:01

reporter   ~0000420

Last edited: 1970-01-01 00:00

centos-3.1 issued with full compliance and a bit more, so near as I can see --
closing

Issue History

Date Modified Username Field Change
2004-04-06 02:01 herrold Status NEW => RESOLVED
2004-04-06 02:01 herrold Resolution => FIXED